What to Know About Parental Alienation in New Jersey

There are few things more challenging than divorce, and, as you know, divorce is something that affects all parties involved. In fact, in certain cases, a divorce can affect a couple’s child more than it even affects the couple themselves. For this reason, it is critical that former spouses do everything they can to make the experience as easy as possible for their children, and while no one is perfect, there are certain actions that are clearly over the line. New Jersey courts determine child custody based on the best interests of the child, and when one parent manipulates and child and otherwise works to sabotage that child’s relationship with his or her other parent, it most likely counts as parental alienation, which can have serious implications for a child. If you believe this is currently happening with your former spouse and your child, you should strongly consider your legal options ahead and speak with our New Jersey family law attorneys. Here are some of the questions you may have:

What is parental alienation, specifically?

Parental alienation comes in all different forms. Sometimes, it can be passive comments about the other parent that, over time, cause a child to connect the dots and draw an unfavorable conclusion about the other parent, regardless of whether there is any truth to the matter. In other cases, parental alienation can come in the form of outright negative comments about the other parent, directly telling the child what to think. Parental alienation comes in all degrees, and no matter how it occurs, it is wrong. Parents should never badmouth each other to their child, and in many cases, they are legally obligated to refrain from doing so.

What can I do if I believe my former spouse is manipulating our child?

If you believe that your former spouse is manipulating your child, you should speak with our New Jersey family law attorneys at once. We can work to file a motion with the courts to modify your custody agreement on the grounds that badmouthing you in front of your child is a violation of your custody agreement, of which the core is to always act in your child’s best interests. As long as we can prove that your former spouse is not acting in your child’s best interests, there is a very good chance that you may receive a modification to your custody agreement. For any further questions, simply give us a call today.

Contact our experienced New Jersey firm

If you require strong legal representation for matters related to divorce or family law, Haber Silver Simpson & Russoniello is here to help. We proudly represent clients in Morris County and throughout the state of New Jersey. Contact our firm today to schedule a consultation.